Upcoming Talks

I and my co-authors (denoted ## below) will be presenting a variety of research projects over the coming months. Hope to see you at one or more of these events…

“Category Promotion: How B Corporations Respond to the Competing Demands of Fitting In and Standing Out” (with Matthew Grimes)

  • Smith Entrepreneurship Research Conference, University of Maryland, USA, May 8-9, 2015.
  • Alliance for Research on Corporate Sustainability Conference. Northwestern University, USA, May 14, 2015.
  • Center for Social Impact Workshop. Ross School of Business, University of Michigan, USA, May 15, 2015.##
  • Industry Studies Association Conference. Kansas City, MO, USA, May 26-29, 2015.

“An Analysis of Hydraulic Fracturing Well Siting in the Pennsylvania Marcellus Shale Boom” (with Dror Etzion) 

  • ESSEC Business School (École Supérieure des Sciences Économiques et Commerciales), France, May 2015.##

“Patently Secret? The Use of Hydraulic Fracturing Patents to Contain Public Risk Information” (with Zhen Lei, Dan Cahoy & Siavash Varasteh)

  • Wharton Technology & Innovation Conference. University of Pennsylvania, USA, April 17-18, 2015.

“Conflicting Institutional Logics and Organizational Identities: How Spinouts Handle Parent Affiliation” (with Daniela Bolzani, Ricardo Fini and Antonio Giuliani)

  • Fourth Triennial Alberta Institutions Conference. Banff Springs Hotel. Banff, AB, Canada, June 12-14, 2015.
  • European Group for Organization Studies Colloquium. ALBA Graduate Business School, Greece, July 2-4, 2015.##

“Betwixt and Between: The Problematic Emergence and Bounding of the Nanotoxicology Field” (with M. Paola Ometto and Michael Lounsbury)

  • Fourth Triennial Alberta Institutions Conference. Banff Springs Hotel. Banff, AB, Canada, June 12-14, 2015.##
  • European Group for Organization Studies Colloquium. ALBA Graduate Business School, Greece, July 2-4, 2015.##
  • Academy of Management Annual Meeting. Vancouver, BC, Canada, August 2015.##

Other events:

  • Panelist. Where Are Values? A Relational Perspective. Macro Perspectives on Behavioral (Macro) Ethics Symposium. Academy of Management Annual Meeting. Vancouver, BC, Canada, August 2015.
  • Panelist. OMT New and Returning Member Networking and Research Forum Professional Development Workshop. Academy of Management Annual Meeting. Vancouver, BC, Canada, August 2015.
  • Organizer. Cultural Entrepreneurship in Action: Innovative Methods and Research Designs Professional Development Workshop (with Vern Glaser & Jochem Kroezen). Presenters included Joep Cornelissen, Peer Fiss, Matthew Grimes, Mark Kennedy, Hovig Tchalian. Academy of Management Annual Meeting. Vancouver, BC, Canada, August 2015.
  • Organizer. Developing a Research Agenda to Advance Perspectives on Performativity. Professional Development Workshop (with Vern Glaser). Presenters included Daniel Beunza, Laure Cabantous, Raghu Garud, Jean-Pascal Gond, Wanda Orlikowski, and Susan Scott. Academy of Management Annual Meeting. Vancouver, BC, Canada, August 2015.

ARCS Conference People’s Choice Award

arcsI’m pleased to report that my working paper, co-authored with Dror Etzion (McGill University), on “An Exploratory Analysis of Cultural Vulnerability and Opportunity Exploitation in Marcellus Shale Drilling,” won the People’s Choice Award at the 2014 Alliance for Research on Corporate Sustainability (ARCS) Conference. Hosted by Cornell University’s Johnson Graduate School of Management, this year’s attendees selected three papers for the award from among the 39 papers presented.

The two other winners included:

  • A dynamic process model of contentious politics: Activist targeting and corporate receptivity to social challenges, by Mary-Hunter McDonnell (Georgetown), Brayden King (Kellogg), and Sarah Soule (Stanford)
  • Can firms pay less and get more…by doing good? Field experimental evidence of the effect of corporate social responsibility on employee salary requirements and performance, by Vanessa Burbano (UCLA)

ARCS is a consortium of member universities, including the University of California, Berkeley (Haas School of Business), the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA Anderson School of Management), Cornell University (Samuel Curtis Johnson Graduate School of Management), Dartmouth University (Tuck School of Business), Duke University (Nicholas School of Environment), Erasmus University (Rotterdam School of Management), Harvard University (Harvard University Center for the Environment), Indiana University (Kelley School of Business), INSEAD (INSEAD Social Innovation Centre), the University of Michigan (Ross School of Business), Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Sloan School of Management), Northwestern University (Kellogg School of Management Ford Motor Company Center for Global Citizenship), the University of Pennsylvania (Wharton School Initiative for Global Environmental Leadership), the University of Virginia (Darden School of Business), Western University (Ivey School of Business) and Yale University (Yale Center for Business and the Environment).

Oil and Gas Well Facility Siting

This week I’ll be giving an invited talk to the University of Alberta’s Department of Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology (REES) in the Faculty of Agriculture, Life & Environmental Sciences (ALES). The talk will be on Thursday, March 20 at 3:30 pm in 550 General Services Building. For more details, visit the REES Seminars and Lectures website. The title of my talk is: “Community Vulnerability and Facility Siting: The Case of Marcellus Shale Gas Drilling, 2004-2012.” This work is joint with Dror Etzion of McGill University.

Abstract: Hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”) has rapidly emerged as an ubiquitous technology for extracting oil and gas from previously inaccessible geological formations. Due to the nature of the technology and its relatively small surface footprint, wells can be sited virtually anywhere, including in close proximity to homes, schools and other sensitive locations. With many uncertainties about the technology still unresolved, critics point to the potential for unequally distributed negative health outcomes among those in regular proximity to drilling sites. Accordingly, for oil and gas companies, deciding upon well sites can be a contentious activity, incorporating not only economic and geological factors but social and community ones as well. In this study, we examine all hydraulically fractured wells in the Marcellus shale play from 2004-2012 in the state of Pennsylvania and assess whether community vulnerabilities played a role in well siting decisions. We find that indicators of socio-demographics, social cohesion and municipal governance are predictors of well siting decisions, beyond the traditional attributes of race and income usually highlighted in the environmental justice literature. Our findings suggest that research on community health should not be limited to phenomena like nuclear power plants and hazardous waste facilities, but should expand to include routine, commonplace and autonomous organizational siting decisions characterized by minimal regulatory involvement.

We are scheduled to present subsequent iterations of this research at the Alliance for Research on Corporate Sustainability, in May 2014 at Cornell University, and again at the Academy of Management Annual Meeting, in August 2014 in Philadelphia.