Performativity as Ongoing Journeys

My latest paper — Performativity as Ongoing Journeys: Implications for Strategy, Entrepreneurship, and Innovation — was published online today. Co-authored with Raghu Garud and Thinley Tharchen (both from Pennsylvania State University), the article is forthcoming in Long Range Planning as part of a special issue on performativity.

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Categorization by Association Paper Reviewed in ASQ

My first publication — Categorization by Association: Nuclear Technology and Emission-Free Electricity — was coauthored with Raghu Garud and Peter Karnøe and appeared in Research in the Sociology of Work, Volume 21: Institutions and Entrepreneurship, edited by Wesley D. Sine and Robert J. David. Other contributors to the volume included W. Richard Scott, Howard Aldrich, Mary Ann Glynn, Candace Jones, Stephen J. Mezias, Theresa K. Lant, Paul Ingram, Chad Navis, Jason Owen-Smith, Paul Ingram, Philippe Monin and others.

The entire volume was reviewed in the latest issue of Administrative Science Quarterly by Klaus Weber of Northwestern University. According to Weber, the eleven chapters “work well as a collection, balancing diversity with a clear sense that the contributors are indeed part of the same conversation.”

Regarding our chapter, Weber writes:

In “Categorization by Association: Nuclear Technology and Emission-free Electricity,” Garud, Gehman, and Karnøe examine entrepreneurial meaning-making. Their study documents changes in the associative meanings of nuclear technology over several decades and provides an account of the agents and material arrangements that influenced this evolution.

Categorization by Association can be downloaded for free at SSRN.

Metatheoretical Perspectives on Sustainability Journeys Now Published

We just received word that “Metatheoretical Perspectives on Sustainability Journeys: Evolutionary, Relational and Durational” will be published in the July 2012 issue of Research Policy as part of a special section on sustainability transitions.

According to Journal Citation Reports, Research Policy had a 1-year impact factor of 2.51 and a 5-year impact factor of 4.24 in 2010, making it the highest rated journal for research related to innovation, technology, and entrepreneurship — ahead of Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice and Journal of Business Venturing, as well as journals such as Harvard Business Review, Management Science, and Organization Studies.

The final citation is Garud, R. & Gehman, J. 2012. Metatheoretical Perspectives on Sustainability Journeys: Evolutionary, Relational and Durational. Research Policy, 41: 980-995.

The paper also is available through SSRN and ResearchGate.

My First Publication

I’m very pleased to report that a paper I began working on in September 2008 has recently been published, which is actually quite rapid as these things go. (If you need immediate gratification, a career in academics is probably not for you.)

Institutions and Entrepreneurship

The paper is called Categorization by Association: Nuclear Technology and Emission-Free Electricity. In the paper we (Raghu Garud, Peter Karnøe and I) analyze the categorization of nuclear technology from 1945 to 2010. In particular, we were intrigued to understand how a technology once categorized as an atomic bomb has been able to transform itself into a technology now considered as a potential source of sustainable and emission-free electricity. Of note, our paper draws on actor network theory and a sociology of associations perspective, and conceptualizes technologies as sociomaterial — that is,  materially anchored, institutionally performed, socially relevant and entrepreneurially negotiated. Based on our findings, we consider some implications for our theoretical understanding of categorization processes. Specifically, we propose that it may be useful to re-conceptualize categories as a relational phenomenon. Rather than being established once and for all, categories can be understood as always in the making. We then suggest directions for future research that such an insight opens up.

The paper appears in Research in the Sociology of Work Volume 21: Institutions and Entrepreneurship, edited by Wesley D. Sine and Robert J. David. Other contributors to the volume include: W. Richard Scott, Howard Aldrich, Mary Ann Glynn, Candace Jones, Stephen J. Mezias , Theresa K. Lant, Paul Ingram, Jason Owen-Smith, Paul Ingram, Philippe Monin and others.

Along the way, my co-authors and I were privileged to have presented working versions of the paper at a number of conferences, including the European Group for Organization Studies Colloquium (July 2009), the Medici Summer School in Management Studies (July 2009), the Wharton Technology Conference (April 2010), the Society for the Advancement of Socio-Economics (June 2010), the Cultural Entrepreneurship Network Workshop (June 2010), the Academy of Management (August 2010), and the West Coast Research Symposium (August 2010).

Third Top 10

This week I received an email from SSRN informing me that my paper with Raghu Garud and Arun Kumaraswamy on “Complexity Arrangements for Sustained Innovation: Lessons from 3M Corporation” was a top ten download for a third month in a row.

This time it was listed in the Entrepreneurship, Innovation, & Growth eJournal Top Ten.

Top 10 Again

This week I received an email from SSRN informing me that my paper with Raghu Garud and Arun Kumaraswamy on “Complexity Arrangements for Sustained Innovation: Lessons from 3M Corporation” was a top ten download for a second month in a row.

This time it was listed in the Entrepreneurship Research and Policy Network: Firm (Topic) Top Ten.

Paper Makes Top 10

This week I just received an email from SSRN informing me that my paper with Raghu Garud and Arun Kumaraswamy on “Complexity Arrangements for Sustained Innovation: Lessons from 3M Corporation” was a top ten download in the Entrepreneurship Research and Policy Network: Organization (Sub-Topic) All Papers.

The paper is forthcoming in Organization Studies in a special issue entitled Towards the Ecological Style: Embracing Complexity in Organizational Research, guest edited by Kevin Dooley and Hari Tsoukas.

Better Mailboxes

It’s not quite a better mousetrap, but here’s a great story from yesterday’s New York Times on “Building a Better Mailbox.”

It’s a wonderful example of the dead ends and false starts endemic to innovation journeys. Capitalizing on the failure of the “Elephant Trunk” mailbox, the founders of Architectural Mailboxes (Vanessa Troyer and Chris Farentinos) landed on their winning idea: the Oasis and the Oasis Jr.

Some clever personal marketing to Rhys Jones at The Home Depot and a “birthday gift” to Jeff Bezos at Amazon.com didn’t hurt either.